"A man is a very small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders." -Lord Dunzany

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One of my photos featured in Tesla Motors article

My panorama photo featured in an article by Tesla Motors

I have been fortunate to have one of my photos featured in an article by the electric car company Tesla Motor. The article is about my ophthalmologist Jens Kratholm – a Tesla superowner with no less than 7 Teslas in his automotive fleet!

Within a short time I have provided the world renowned media company Trollbäck+Company and now Tesla Motors with my photos. I am really happy and honored that not only my regular readers – but also major companies notice my photographic work! This article was picked up by several major newspapers, including The New York Times.

You can read the Tesla Motors article by clicking here!

 


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Evensong for the Fjord

I am crazy busy!

Therefore I have a question for your readers: Would you rather have me post photos without all the texts and explanations (which takes a lot of time to write), rather than no photo at all?

Here is one from yesterday! Please enjoy! And you make med extremely happy every time you hit the Like-button!

Evensong for The Fjord

Evensong for The Fjord – this is how dark it gets here in the Arctic Region of Narvik right now. Photo taken on May 19. 2013 at 11:34 pm


Preparing for the 17th of May

I’ve met some nice people today. Especially Senior Advisor at Apple in Ireland Samantha and Netflix-supporter Audrey from Denver, Colorado, USA. Such nice people to speak/chat with. They make you feel right at home. Service minded and professionals and really astute at their field of work. It makes me no less than happy to meet people like that, so hello to Samantha and Audrey and a big thank you for all your kind help and great service!

The day today has otherwise stressing. It is the day before our constitution day – May 17. – so, along with a long list with pressing tasks on my to-do-list, we’ve shopped for tomorrow in the absolute frenzy today.

Just popped out to draw some fresh air and shoot a quick shot of the current weather today, but back to the last piece of work that needs wrapping up!

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Young Female Moose

Young Female Moose trimming the tree buds in between the houses

Young Female Moose trimming the tree buds in between the houses today


Shooting Moose

That's close enough mate! Neighbor taking a close-up of the local moose

That’s close enough mate! Neighbor taking a close-up of the local moose

This young Moose (Alces alces) female is wandering around in the area, mostly trimming the wild tree buds – but occasionally also helping herself to some of the more exotic and delicious shrubs in the gardens around here. And she isn’t very much afraid. In fact, one of the neighbors came driving home today, but she wouldn’t move, so he had to park down by the road and take a detour to get up to his house. The other neighbor wanted to take a close up, and walked near enough for her to raise her leg in warning that he was close enough. One shouldn’t be afraid of these animals – but they demand to be respected and kept at a distance. A kick from the fore legs can easily be deadly. Usually they don’t attack, unless you startle them, come between a cow and her calves or are perceived as a challenge from one of the bulls during mating season.

The Norwegian female Moose is usually between 180 and 210 centimeters tall (shoulder height) and weighs between 200 and 400 kg. The bull is about 190 and 220 centimeters and weighs 200 to 600 kg.

Their fantastic ability to digest cellulose through an intricate system of bowl enzymes has been studied so that the same enzymes could be used to produce sustainable biofuels from wood.


Very Early Morning Light

The Midnight Sun is just around the corner. I shot this photo at 3:37 am (+1 DST) last night. The sun briefly dips below the horizon now – before it rises again. Soon it will be shining through the living room windows at midnight.

The Midnight Sun is not far away now

The Midnight Sun is not far away now


Sleepless in Narvik

I suffer from insomnia due to chronic pain. That is most times a disadvantage – but not always. Walking around at night trying to concentrate the pain away mentally sometimes make me grab my camera to find a moment of Photo Zen… A couple of nights ago I captured this photo of Narvik and the newly installed light-show on the new hotel downtown. I posted it in the local Facebook-group Narvik før og nå (Narvik in the past and now, loosely translated). It gained a quite surprising and enormous popularity, so I thought that would be a good cherry picked candidate for my blog. Here it is! Enjoy!

Sleepless in Narvik - The newly installed light show on the new hotel downtown reflects in the harbor basin.

Sleepless in Narvik – The newly installed light show on the new hotel downtown reflects in the harbor basin.


Sun Day (official)

Today – February 7. – is the official Sun Day in Narvik. That is the day, the sun is no longer obscured by the mountains and it shines down on the town square. The dark season of 2013 is over officially, although a lot of valleys and villages in the municipality has to wait for days, even weeks for the sun to get high enough in the sky to shine down on them. Time flies – and soon the midnight sun will shine in through windows from the oposite side of the Ofoten Fjord.

The official sun day is celebrated with taking half the day off and of course eating sun buns.

Official Sun Day

The sun is shining downtown today. To the left is the town hall (square building) and the newly built Rica Hotell. Further up the mountain slope Narvik University College is partly lit by the sun beaming down the mountain side.


A Miracle! — Celebrating 31,000 + visitors with Stetind

Stetind - National Mountain of Norway. I share this symbolically with you to celebrate this new record in visitors to my blog.

Stetind – National Mountain of Norway. I share this symbolically with you to celebrate this new record in visitors to my blog.

January 6. there had been more than 13,000 visitors to my blog since September 30. 2010.

In just three weeks the number has expanded two and a half times –  to 31,648 visits as I write this..! Amazing! In just three weeks. I can hardly believe it. Talking about peak in the statistics!

So – symbolically – I decided to share with you a photo I took this summer of The National Mountain of Norway – Stetind (1,392 meters above sea level). This mountain has fascinated Norwegian and foreigners alike for centuries. And it is hard to climb. It was not until July 30. 1910 that Ferdinand Schjelderup, Carl Wilhelm Rubenson, and Alf Bonnevie Bryn finally summit Stetind (for more information, please read this fine Wikipedia article about the mountain).

So, with this photo taken July 30. 2012 I thank all my avid readers and please share this blog with your friends, if you enjoy it!

PS: almost at the bottom of the blog, there is a link called << Older Entries. I recommend you to flick back through the pages. There are lots more photos than what is presented on the first page. My favorite photo subject is Northern Lights and you’ll find several photos of this fantastic phenomenon there, and you can even follow how I progress in mastering this difficult discipline of photography. I hope you will enjoy these many stories back to September 30. 2010.


Golden Top

The sun is shining on the mountain tops. In not very long, it will shine on the city after a long time in the darkness. First sign of spring.

First Sign of Springtime

First Sign of Springtime


13,000 visitors by the start of 2013!

I rounded 13,000 visitors to this blog – and I celebrate by sharing another photo from New Years Eve. Enjoy!

Very early January 1. 2013

Very early January 1. 2013


Happy New Year!

Well over an hour into the new year 2013, I wish everybody a very prosperous and

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year from Narvik!

Happy New Year from Narvik!


Light – but no sun

This is a photo of the darkest day of the year in The Polar Night in Narvik. All though the sun is far from showing itself, we have a few hours in the middle of the day when the light is just Magical. The umber reflections of the sun below the horizon emanates the landscape and creates a special, dreamy warm light despite the cold up here.

All though we have no sun here in The Polar Night - the light is Magical!

All though we have no sun here in The Polar Night – the light is Magical! Narvik on the Winter solstice 2012


One from the archives

I really enjoy looking through older photos, and thought this would actually deserve a posting. It’s taken one the magic night 23. January 1216 pm. The northern light was absolutely stunning that evening…

Northern Lights January 23. 2012 with the Fagernes mt. and parts of the city Narvik in the foreground.

Northern Lights January 23. 2012 with the Fagernes mt. and parts of the city Narvik in the foreground.


Rising moon above the City

Shot this photo of the moon rising this evening above Narvik.

Moon over Narvik

Moon over Narvik


Still retaining “That ole Swiss Cheese Look”

I popped out a couple of days ago and captured this photo of our beloved companion in space. The old spellbinder and maker of romantic promises. The old natural satellite faithfully circling our home like a watch dog, gobbling up debris and preventing a lot of unpleasant collisions with Earth. This goddess Selene. Luna the treacherous – thought to have the power to turn people into luna-tics…

Whatever you wish to call her, she is beautiful, and still retaining “That ole Swiss Cheese Look”.

Full moon over Narvik

Full moon over Narvik


The waneing sun

The days are rapidly getting shorter. Geographically the sun should disappear on November 22. But because of the mountains, the sun disappears a few days earlier. Geographically the sun reappears the February 6., but again because of the mountains the actual observation of the sun is a few days later.

In between these dates it is dark here. Around Christmas it is just a faint dusky light around noon, the rest of the 22 hours of the day it is dark. Pitch dark – as in the middle of the night. It is the dark season. But this time of year makes it even more cozy with lights, especially candle lights. AND it is the season of Northern Lights! During summer, the midnight sun lights up the sky day and night, thus drowning the faint light from the Northern Light. In the winter-time it is the other way around!

Even now the sun is setting early. This photo of reflections in the snow-covered mountains from sunset was taken 15:58 today.

Reflections from the sunset on snow covered mountains today

Reflections from the sunset on snow-covered mountains today


Spooky!

Not much tricking or treating here tonight, but we got a visit from these spooky charachters, and found it wisest to treat them with something sweet. It worked! “Knask eller knep” is the equivalent to the English “Trick or Treat”, only that the words have been switched around. Knask=Treat and Knep=Trick…

Halloween visit on Ankenes, Norway

Halloween visit on Ankenes, Norway


Winter is here!

Winter is here. I defied my crippling back pain and went out to shoot a few photos. Enjoy!

Snow showers coming in the Ofoten Fjord - Eibhlin of Panama is being loaded at pier 5

Snow showers coming in the Ofoten Fjord – Eibhlin of Panama is being loaded at pier 5

A tiny waterfall on Ankenes freezing up

A tiny waterfall on Ankenes freezing up

Beisfjord and the mountain Beisfjordtøtta farthest away in between the snow showers

Beisfjord and the mountain Beisfjordtøtta farthest away in between the snow showers

The alpine slope on Ankenes needs a little bit more snow to be in service

The alpine slope on Ankenes needs a little bit more snow to be in service

 

 

 


Ofoten Fjord lit up by Northern Lights

This old and slow computer really needs changing now. Moore’s Law is very much in effect here. But I enjoy very much sharing my photos with you – and by the looks of it – you enjoy it to! Lesley Carter is one of my most avid readers. Her blog Bucket List Publication – lesleycarter.com is really nice – especially if you’re a viking roaming the seven seas (and the lands in between). So please check it out! And she is – according to her profile page – pregnant as well: so congrats and best wishes all around, Lesley!

This photo was taken from Ankens with view of the Ofoten Fjord and the mountain range Veggen (loosly translates to “The Wall”) in the background on October the 12. Enjoy!

Northern Lights lighting up The Ofoten Fjord with the mountain range Veggen in the background. October 12. 2012

Northern Lights lighting up The Ofoten Fjord with the mountain range Veggen in the background. October 12. 2012


“The Light Machine”

"The Light Machine" - Lighthouse on Ankenes and Northern Lights behind fast moving clouds up above.

The lighthouse on Ankenes and Northern Lights up above behind some fast moving clouds. Taken on October the 13.

"The Light Machine" - Lighthouse on Ankenes and Northern Lights behind fast moving clouds up above.

“The Light Machine” – Lighthouse on Ankenes and Northern Lights behind some fast-moving clouds up above.


And one more

Northern Lights - Ankenes - seen from the breakwater towards the south

This is taken the same evening (October 14. 2012) as the previous photo. Here the Northern Light is somewhat stronger. This view is towards the South and the previous photo is taken towards the North.

Northern Lights - Ankenes - seen from the breakwater towards the south

Northern Lights – Ankenes – seen from the breakwater towards the south


A few picker uppers – Northern Lights shows

Quiet – but it’s there

It’s been very, very quiet on the Northern Lights front. The particle flow is very good. Now, I am not a physicist – but I have a fair share of knowledge in the field, having studied it and been a happy member of the Physics Club at The University of Tromsø (The Northern Lights Capital of Norway – a really fun city with lots of things to explore – I highly recommend it). In my humble opinion when the Solar Wind is at low speeds (right now ~500 km/s) – as it is right now, and the Geomagnetic Field component is neutral and the Dynamic pressure is low – even with a quite strong stream of charged particles from the Sun – all we get here is a “vail” of Northern Lights, but things changes fast. Sudden Solar Prominences can quickly change the conditions for Northern Lights.

2013 – A peak year

The solar activity in terms of Solar Prominences (also known as protuberanses) varies. These are known as Solar Cycles (or Magnetic Activity Cycles). They peak about every 11. year. 2013 is an estimated new peak. In correlations with this heightened activity, solar observatories register a rise in Sun Spots.

The photo below is taken in Ankenes the 15. – which was a pretty good day for shooting, but this faint “vail” captivated me enough to develop.

Faint Vail at 01:55 am above the Fagernes Mt.

Faint Vail at 01:55 am above the Fagernes Mt.


The Flash Bang!

One of the two biggest flashes last night.

To round of a quiet night with practically no northern lights and some editing work on the aging computer – here is one of the big flashes from last night! Glad Wenche came out in time to see this! Better than fireworks – isn’t it!

One of the two biggest flashes last night.

One of the two biggest flashes last night.